Announcement

Have you heard of purple heart wood?

Here at The Table Guy, we’re all about statement furniture. And this September, we’re looking forward to introducing three new types of wood to our community!
Full disclosure: We’ll only be bringing in one slab of each type for this batch, but if you see something you like don’t hesitate to ask if we can source a piece for you. In addition, while we do not currently control the entire supply chain, all types of wood mentioned here are sourced from our FSC-certified supplier to ensure that the part of the supply chain we cannot control adheres to internationally-recognized regulations. Read more about FSC-certification here.  

Read on to learn more about them and sign up for same-day notification when they arrive!

 

P U R P L E . H E A R T
AKA A M A R A N T H

Where does it come from? 

Central and South America. The harvested wood is then processed in China, by our FSC-certified supplier.  

What is it, actually? 

Purple Heart wood is a particularly sturdy hardwood named for its purplish hue, a natural occurrence in the heart of the slab.
For more science, read here.

What’s different about it? 

Colour.
Wood from the Purple Heart starts relatively light, and darkens with exposure to air and UV light, ultimately maturing to a deep and striking violet. This spectacular colour is paired with a relatively subtle and clean grain face, allowing this uncommon tone to remain the distinctive star of the show. Purple Heart wood is also remarkably strong and its intrinsic resins naturally help to prevent decay and deter insects as long as stored in the right conditions.

Special Notes: 

Purple Heart wood will continue to darken with exposure to UV light, in some cases darkening to a near-black tone. Should you wish to prevent this, please make sure to speak to your sales advisor about opting for a UV-resistant finish. Do note that all finishes wear off with time (it’s a fact of life), so periodic updates of a UV-resistant finish is required to upkeep the colour protection. Alternatively, consider embracing the beauty of the material’s natural evolution, that simply can’t be seen anywhere else.

Is it sustainable? 

Currently, yes. This species is not listed on any conservation watchlists and there are no known sustainability issues.

 

J A P A N E S E . Z E L K O V A
AKA K E Y A K I

Where does it come from? 

Japan. The harvested wood is then processed in China, by our FSC-certified supplier.  

What is it, actually? 

Japanese Zelkova is a type of hardwood native to Japan, and is considered similarly premium to Japanese Cypress (Hinoki).
For more science, read here.

What’s different about it? 

Zen and Firm
Japanese Zelkova achieves a remarkable balance of exhibiting stunning grain without the drama, resulting in a quiet and dignified elegance. Showcasing classic lines through contrast within the grain, this wood is at once an earthy yet modern addition to any interior. Once a popular choice for construction timber in Japan due to its structural robustness, due to its rising premium status, Japanese Zelkova is currently used mainly in temple-building rather home construction, while growing in popularity for furniture and wood-slab tables as these uses allow us to enjoy more of the grain pattern.

Is it sustainable? 

Currently, yes. This species is not listed on any conservation watchlists and is primarily available as plantation timber.

r e d c e d a r

Where does it come from? 

New Zealand. The harvested wood is then processed in China, by our FSC-certified supplier.  

What is it, actually? 

Cedar is a traditionally popular type of softwood used in furniture-making and carpentry. Red Cedar is a variant that is known for its distinguishing tone and distinctive grain face.
For more science, read here.

What’s different about it? 

Striking and Unusual
Red Cedar is distinguished by its rose-toned heartwood and pale sapwood that can be found even within the heartwood itself. The grain face is often dramatic, exhibiting various natural artefacts such as knots, growth rings and the occasional deviation from an otherwise straight grain.

Special Notes: 

Cedar is relatively softer than other hardwoods in our stable of slabs. This makes it easier to maintain as the surface can be lightly hand-sanded regularly to remove any fine scratches, but also makes it more vulnerable to the same scratches. Do be mindful of your personal lifestyle preferences when considering softwood, and note that cedar can also be enjoyed in other types of furniture such as display or TV consoles that experience less frequent interaction.

Is it sustainable? 

Currently, yes. This species is not listed on any conservation watchlists.